Archetype: Pocahontas of Brazil: Anita Garibaldi

Official name is Ana Maria de Jesus Ribeiroda  Silva di Garibaldi, commonly known as Anita Garibaldi. Anita was born August 30, 1821 and died August 4. 1849. Anita was the Brazilian wife and comrade in arms of Italian revolutionary Giuseppe Garibaldi. Giuseppe and Anita’s relationship was epitomized during the 19th century’s age of romanticism and revolutionary liberalism.

Anita’s early socio-economic background was not the greatest; born into a poor family of Azorean Portuguese descent, or what some people would refer to as Creoles. Anita was originally from the southern state of Santa Catarina, born into a newly independent Brazil. At the age of 15, in 1835 Anita was forced to marry Manuel Duarte Aguiae, who later abandoned her.

Giuseppe was a Ligurian sailor turned Italian nationalist revolutionary. He had fled Europe in 1836 and was fighting on behalf of a separatist republic in Southern Brazil, or commonly known as the War of Farrapos.

It has been said that Anita taught Giuseppe about the gaucho/caudillo culture of the plains of Brazil, Uruguay, and Northern Argentina.  In 1841, Anita and Giuseppe went to Montevideo, Uruguay, where he worked as a schoolmaster and a trader before taking the command of the Uruguayan fleet in 1842 and raising an Italian Legion for Uruguay against Argentine dictator; Juan Manuel de Rosas. There isn’t much of Anita’s occupation was during this time. Anita lacked a formal education and what we do know about her was dictated notes.

Anita and Giuseppe married March 26, 1842 in Montevideo. They had five children; Menotti (1840-1905), Rosita (1843-45), Teresita (1845-1903) and Ricciotti (1846-1924). Anita was carrying their 5th child when she died during a tragic retreat against Neapolitan and French intervention of Rome.

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About rebellioustudent

Anthropolgy and English student, extremely rebellious at heart and outspoken. I am going into my fourth year of an undergrad, after that who knows?
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